@Annotations: The Underducks

Some of Rubberduck’s coolest features are literally hidden – not intentionally… but exposing them in the UI just wasn’t a top priority, or proved to be quite complex to implement in a nice user-friendly way.

Sad, because it makes them look like underdogs underducks, when they really deserve to show up front & center.

@Folder

Since v2.0.12, adding a new test module to a VBA project makes it show up under a “Tests” folder in the Code Explorer:

folders

You might be thinking “oh cool, folders!” and then go and try to add one using the Add command, or right-click somewhere to find some “add folder” command, and eventually give up.

Folders aren’t real. VBA doesn’t support folders; the code files aren’t even code files, they’re embedded in a host document! So we can’t just “create a folder” in a VBA project, it has to be something else.

This is what an early-bound 2.0.12 test module’s declarations section looks like:

testmodule

Notice the @Folder(“Tests”) comment. Folders don’t really exist, but by annotating code modules like this Rubberduck can make them seem real, at least in the Code Explorer.

You can control which module appears under which folder by modifying the annotation, using the dot (“.”) as a separator:

folders2.PNG

The Code Explorer‘s bottom panel shows the @Folder annotation that’s responsible for creating the selected folder, when a folder is selected (if no folder is specified, everything goes to a default “VBAProject” folder).

In this case:

@Folder("Tests.Functionality2")

Or whatever you want to make it. When two or more modules have “Tests” as a “root folder”, Rubberduck knows to show these two modules under the same “Tests” folder.

This means large VBA projects with a ton of classes can now be organized in folders for easier browsing, like large VB.NET projects are organized in namespaces. Now VBA doesn’t support namespaces, the rules haven’t changed: you can’t have two same-name modules in the same VBA project regardless of which “folder” you’re putting them in. But it sure makes it much easier to organize things.

The reason we can’t have a simple “create folder” command, is ultimately because VBA doesn’t support folders: we can’t create an empty folder, a folder only exists because there’s a module that has an annotation that created it.

What if there’s more than one annotation?

Rubberduck will only ever use the first @Folder annotation it finds in a module; any subsequent @Folder annotation is ignored. So you can have this:

@Folder("Tests")
@Folder("Foo.Bar")

And Rubberduck won’t be confused; the Code Explorer will have that module under the “Tests” folder, and unless there’s another module somewhere that specifies “Foo.Bar”, there won’t be a “Foo.Bar” folder anywhere.

But because multiple @Folder annotations are potentially confusing for us mere mortals, we’ve implemented an inspection that warns you when a module has more than one single @Folder annotation specified:

multiple-folders.PNG

Future versions will probably introduce a quick-fix for that inspection, so that extraneous annotations can be removed without even looking at the code module itself.


@IgnoreModule

Sometimes a single module can be responsible for a lot of inspection results, and that module can’t really be changed/fixed right now because, y’know, reasons – so you’d like to prevent Rubberduck inspections from looking at that module, so you can focus on inspection results from other modules without drowning them in noise from a module you’d like to ignore.

Since 2.0.12 you can now make code inspections completely ignore a specific module, with a single module-level annotation:

@IgnoreModule

Now that’s great, but it’s also drastic: all inspections will ignore that module. If all you wanted was to shut off the use meaningful names inspection for that module without disabling the inspection itself, you can parameterize the annotation:

@IgnoreModule UseMeaningfulName

And now only the use meaningful name inspection will be ignored in that module, without turning off the inspection itself.

So how do you know what inspection names to use? These names are the actual internal class names (minus the “Inspection” suffix) of each inspection in the Rubberduck code base itself, so they’re not exactly easy to get if you’re not looking at the Inspections namespace… fortunately the project’s website uses the Rubberduck build itself to create the Inspections/List page, and the inspection names appear in the bullet-list:

all-inspections.PNG

…of course, the website processes the names to insert spaces (based on the PascalCase casing – that’s why ByVal appears as “By Val”), so the actual usable @Ignore and @IgnoreModule annotation parameters are all in that list, except you need to remove the spaces when using them.

The @Ignore annotation uses the same mechanism, except it works at individual inspection result level; the Ignore Once quickfix that’s available for most inspections, automatically inserts @Ignore annotations, but there’s currently no way to automatically add an @IgnoreModule annotation – future versions will most definitely fix that though.

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