Making MVVM Work in VBA Part 2: Event Propagation

Using a WithEvents variable to handle the MSForms.Control events of, say, a TextBox control has the irritating tendency to throw a rather puzzling run-time error 459 “Object or class does not support the set of events”. To be honest, I had completely forgotten about this when I started working on this MVVM framework. I had even posted an answer on Stack Overflow and my learning-it-the-hard-way is immortalized on that page.

…there’s a bit of COM hackery going on behind the scenes; there’s enough smokes & mirrors for VBA to successfully compile the above, but, basically, you’re looking at a glitch in The Matrix (Rubberduck’s resolver has similar “nope” issues with MSForms controls): there isn’t any obvious way to get VBA to bind a dynamic control object to its MSForms.Control events.

-Mathieu Guindon, Apr 18 ’19 

What I hadn’t noticed until today, was that another user had posted an answer to that question a few hours later that day – and that answer ultimately leads to the groundbreaking manual wiring-up of what VBA normally does automagically under the hood when we declare a WithEvents variable.

pUnk’d

The code I’m about to share is heavily based on the work shared on Stack Overflow by user Evr, and uses the ConnectToConnectionPoint Win32 API that, it must be mentioned, comes with a caveat:

This function is available through Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. It might be altered or unavailable in subsequent versions of Windows.

Regardless, it works (for now anyway, …if we lose Mac support for this specific capability).

Rubberduck uses similar connection points to handle a number of VBE events that aren’t otherwise exposed, so I knew this was going to work one way or another. The idea is to pass an IUnknown pointer to an object that exposes members with very specific VB_UserMemId attribute values, and have accordingly very specific member signatures.

This post lists a bunch of such attributes – however since there aren’t any problems with binding regular TextBox and CommandButton events (these do work with simple WithEvents event providers), I’m only interested in these:

EventVB_UserMemId
AfterUpdate-2147384832
BeforeUpdate-2147384831
Enter-2147384830
Exit-2147384829
The VB_UserMemId attribute values for each of the MSForms.Control events.

This is going to be a little bit lower-level than usual, but every VBA user class has an IUnknown pointer, So we can use any class module that has the members with the appropriate VB_UserMemId attribute values, and pass that as the pUnk pointer argument.

So, here’s the punk in question, exactly as I currently have it:

VERSION 1.0 CLASS
BEGIN
  MultiUse = -1  'True
END
Attribute VB_Name = "ControlEventsPunk"
Attribute VB_GlobalNameSpace = False
Attribute VB_Creatable = False
Attribute VB_PredeclaredId = False
Attribute VB_Exposed = False
Attribute VB_Description = "Provides an event sink to relay MSForms.Control events."
'@Folder MVVM.Infrastructure.Win32
'@ModuleDescription "Provides an event sink to relay MSForms.Control events."
'based on https://stackoverflow.com/a/51936950
Option Explicit
Implements IControlEvents
Private Type GUID
    Data1 As Long
    Data2 As Integer
    Data3 As Integer
    Data4(0 To 7) As Byte
End Type
'[This function is available through Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. It might be altered or unavailable in subsequent versions of Windows.]
'https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/win32/api/shlwapi/nf-shlwapi-connecttoconnectionpoint
#If VBA7 Then
Private Declare PtrSafe Function ConnectToConnectionPoint Lib "shlwapi" Alias "#168" (ByVal Punk As stdole.IUnknown, ByRef riidEvent As GUID, ByVal fConnect As Long, ByVal PunkTarget As stdole.IUnknown, ByRef pdwCookie As Long, Optional ByVal ppcpOut As LongPtr) As Long
#Else
Private Declare Function ConnectToConnectionPoint Lib "shlwapi" Alias "#168" (ByVal punk As stdole.IUnknown, ByRef riidEvent As GUID, ByVal fConnect As Long, ByVal punkTarget As stdole.IUnknown, ByRef pdwCookie As Long, Optional ByVal ppcpOut As Long) As Long
#End If
Private Type TState
    RefIID As GUID 'The IID of the interface on the connection point container whose connection point object is being requested.
    Connected As Boolean
    PunkTarget As Object
    Cookie As Long
    
    Handlers As Collection
End Type
'from https://stackoverflow.com/a/61893857 (same user as #51936950!)
Private Const ExitEventID As Long = -2147384829
Private Const EnterEventID As Long = -2147384830
Private Const BeforeUpdateEventID As Long = -2147384831
Private Const AfterUpdateEventID As Long = -2147384832
Private This As TState
'@Description "Gets/sets the target MSForms.Control reference."
Public Property Get Target() As Object
Attribute Target.VB_Description = "Gets/sets the target MSForms.Control reference."
    Set Target = This.PunkTarget
End Property
Public Property Set Target(ByVal RHS As Object)
    Set This.PunkTarget = RHS
End Property
'@Description "Registers the listener."
Public Function Connect() As Boolean
Attribute Connect.VB_Description = "Registers the listener."
    GuardClauses.GuardNullReference This.PunkTarget, TypeName(Me), "Target is not set."
    ConnectToConnectionPoint Me, This.RefIID, True, This.PunkTarget, This.Cookie, 0&
    This.Connected = This.Cookie <> 0
    Connect = This.Connected
End Function
'@Description "De-registers the listener."
Public Function Disconnect() As Boolean
Attribute Connect.VB_Description = "De-registers the listener."
    If Not This.Connected Then Exit Function
    ConnectToConnectionPoint Me, This.RefIID, False, This.PunkTarget, This.Cookie, 0&
    This.Connected = False
    Disconnect = True
End Function
'@Description "A callback that handles MSForms.Control.AfterUpdate events for the registered target control."
Public Sub OnAfterUpdate()
Attribute OnAfterUpdate.VB_UserMemId = -2147384832
Attribute OnAfterUpdate.VB_Description = "A callback that handles MSForms.Control.AfterUpdate events for the registered target control."
    Dim Handler As IHandleControlEvents
    For Each Handler In This.Handlers
        Handler.HandleAfterUpdate
    Next
End Sub
'@Description "A callback that handles MSForms.Control.BeforeUpdate events for the registered target control."
Public Sub OnBeforeUpdate(ByVal Cancel As MSForms.ReturnBoolean)
Attribute OnBeforeUpdate.VB_UserMemId = -2147384831
Attribute OnBeforeUpdate.VB_Description = "A callback that handles MSForms.Control.BeforeUpdate events for the registered target control."
    Dim Handler As IHandleControlEvents
    For Each Handler In This.Handlers
        Handler.HandleBeforeUpdate Cancel
    Next
End Sub
'@Description "A callback that handles MSForms.Control.Exit events for the registered target control."
Public Sub OnExit(ByVal Cancel As MSForms.ReturnBoolean)
Attribute OnExit.VB_UserMemId = -2147384829
Attribute OnExit.VB_Description = "A callback that handles MSForms.Control.Exit events for the registered target control."
    Dim Handler As IHandleControlEvents
    For Each Handler In This.Handlers
        Handler.HandleExit Cancel
    Next
End Sub
'@Description "A callback that handles MSForms.Control.Enter events for the registered target control."
Public Sub OnEnter()
Attribute OnEnter.VB_UserMemId = -2147384830
Attribute OnEnter.VB_Description = "A callback that handles MSForms.Control.Enter events for the registered target control."
    Dim Handler As IHandleControlEvents
    For Each Handler In This.Handlers
        Handler.HandleEnter
    Next
End Sub
'@Description "Registers the specified object to handle the relayed control events."
Public Sub RegisterHandler(ByVal Handler As IHandleControlEvents)
Attribute RegisterHandler.VB_Description = "Registers the specified object to handle the relayed control events."
    This.Handlers.Add Handler
End Sub
Private Sub Class_Initialize()
    Set This.Handlers = New Collection
    This.RefIID.Data1 = &H20400
    This.RefIID.Data4(0) = &HC0
    This.RefIID.Data4(7) = &H46
End Sub
Private Sub IControlEvents_OnAfterUpdate()
    OnAfterUpdate
End Sub
Private Sub IControlEvents_OnBeforeUpdate(ByVal Cancel As MSForms.IReturnBoolean)
    OnBeforeUpdate Cancel
End Sub
Private Sub IControlEvents_OnEnter()
    OnEnter
End Sub
Private Sub IControlEvents_OnExit(ByVal Cancel As MSForms.IReturnBoolean)
    OnExit Cancel
End Sub
Private Sub IControlEvents_RegisterHandler(ByVal Handler As IHandleControlEvents)
    RegisterHandler Handler
End Sub

Let’s ignore the IControlEvents interface for now. The class has a Target – that’ll be our TextBox control instance. So we set the Target, and then we can invoke Connect, and when we’re done we can invoke Disconnect to explicitly undo the wiring-up.

Then we have an OnEnter method with VB_UserMemId = -2147384830, which makes it an event handler procedure for MSForms.Control.Enter. The name of the procedure isn’t relevant, but it’s important that the procedure is parameterless.

Similarly, the name of the OnExit procedure has no importance, but it must have a single ByVal Cancel As MSForms.ReturnBoolean parameter (only ByVal and the data type matter). For events that have more than one parameter, the order is also important.

In theory that’s all we need: we could go on and handle Control.Exit in this OnExit procedure, and call it a day. In fact you can probably do that right away – however I need another step for my purposes, because I’m going to need my PropertyBindingBase class to propagate these events “up” to, say, some TextBoxPropertyBinding class that can implement some TextBox-specific behavior for the Control events.

Propagating Events

I had already a working pattern for my INotifyPropertyChange requirements to propagate property changes across objects, and the pattern is applicable here too. See, I could have declared a Public Event Exit(ByRef Cancel As MSForms.ReturnBoolean) on the ControlEventsPunk class, and then I could have used a WithEvents variable to handle them – and that would have worked too. Except I don’t want to use events here, because events work well as implementation details… but they can’t be exposed on an interface, which makes them actually more complicated to work with.

There are two interfaces: one that defines the “events” and exposes a method to register “handlers”, and the other mandates the presence of a callback for each “event”. For INotifyPropertyChange the handler interface was named IHandlePropertyChange, so I went with IControlEvents and IHandleControlEvents.

So, the “provider” interface looks like this:

'@Folder MVVM.Infrastructure.Bindings.Abstract
'@ModuleDescription "Provides the infrastructure to relay MSForms.Control events."
Option Explicit
Public Sub RegisterHandler(ByVal Handler As IHandleControlEvents)
End Sub
Public Sub OnEnter()
End Sub
Public Sub OnExit(ByVal Cancel As MSForms.ReturnBoolean)
End Sub
Public Sub OnAfterUpdate()
End Sub
Public Sub OnBeforeUpdate(ByVal Cancel As MSForms.ReturnBoolean)
End Sub

And then the “handler” interface looks like this:

'@Folder MVVM.Infrastructure.Bindings.Abstract
'@ModuleDescription "An object that can be registered as a handler for IControlEvents callbacks."
Option Explicit
Public Sub HandleEnter()
End Sub
Public Sub HandleExit(ByVal Cancel As MSForms.ReturnBoolean)
End Sub
Public Sub HandleAfterUpdate()
End Sub
Public Sub HandleBeforeUpdate(ByVal Cancel As MSForms.ReturnBoolean)
End Sub

So, looking back at the ControlEventsPunk class, we find that the implementation for RegisterHandler consists in adding the provided Handler object to an encapsulated Collection that holds all the registered handlers; when we “handle” a control event, we iterate all registered handlers and invoke them all in a sequence. When an event has a Cancel parameter, the last handler that ran gets the final say on whether the parameter should be True or False, and each handler receives the Cancel value that was set by the previous handler than ran.

This is a slightly different paradigm than your regular VBA/VB6 auto-wired events, where one event only ever has one handler: now these work more like the multicast delegates that events are in .NET, with an “invocation list” and the ability to add/remove (although, I haven’t implemented the removal) handlers dynamically at run-time – except the “handlers” are full-fledged VBA objects here, rather than .NET delegates.

Whenever the MVVM infrastructure needs to propagate events, I use this pattern instead. This was my first time actually implementing an Observer Pattern, and hadn’t even realized! (thanks Max!) – that isn’t a pattern you see often in event-capable languages, but I can definitely see this proven, solid abstraction (Java developers would probably be rather familiar with that one) become my new favorite go-to pattern to expose events on an interface in VBA… But there’s probably a reason the first time I come across a situation where that pattern is really handy (and actually needed, for testability), is when I’m writing framework-level (i.e. an API intended to be used by code that isn’t written yet) code that’s very much as deep into the OOP rabbit hole as I’ve ever been in VBA (or any other language for that matter)… and there’s still no rock bottom in sight.

In any case, now that we have a way to handle and propagate control events, we can have MVVM property bindings that can format TextBox.Text on exit, i.e. we can have a ViewModel that knows SomeProperty has a value of 25.59, and the Text property of the bound textbox control can say $25.59 just by specifying a FormatString (like “Currency”, for example) when we create the binding.

For the next post in this series I think we’re ready to deep-dive into the actual binding mechanics, and I’ll have the updated MVVM infrastructure code on GitHub by then.

4 thoughts on “Making MVVM Work in VBA Part 2: Event Propagation”

  1. Great stuff, Matt. I only discovered your blog and projects a few days ago, but I’ve wanted to see something like this for a long time. It will be great to have an open source MVVM framework to build off of and point people to. I Hope you’re able to carve out lots of time for this project –I’m already seeing what I can do with the example files you uploaded.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for the feedback! I’ve indeed been spending quite a lot of time on this MVVM framework project lately (more than what’s healthy TBH!), and it’s starting to look very good and I think I can make it robust enough to withstand massive widespread usage… I’m currently working on string-formatting and validation error adorners (these already work, just gotta fix a little glitch and streamline validation a bit and then I’m ready to share the work); there’s something completely unreal tabbing out of a textbox that says 1234.56 and poof it’s now $1,234.56 and the textbox only accepts numeric keys (and a decimal separator) and all that needed to happen for that to work, was to specify a FormatString and a NumericKeyValidator argument to the binding! Or tab out of a textbox that says “10/5/2020” and have it turn into “October 5, 2020” and it automagically round-trips to a Date property on the ViewModel, using a StringToDateConverter instance and a custom StringFormat!
      Validation errors are handled by a ValidationErrorAdorner object (which uses the ValidationErrorFormatter class that was already in the proof-of-concept code), such that a property binding’s Target control can automatically be “adorned” with a dynamic (spawned at run-time by the framework) label and/or an icon just above or below (or even inside) the target control. Argh here I go again, I’ll stop here before I write the whole next article in this comment box! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

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