Making MVVM Work in VBA Part 1 – Testing

I have recently written (100% VBA) a proof-of-concept for a Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) framework, and since the prototype works exactly as needed (with some rough edges of course)… I’ve decided to explore what Rubberduck can do to make MVVM fully supported, but going down that path poses a serious problem that needs a very good and well thought-out solution.

A Vision of a Framework

When you start a new project in Visual Studio (including 6.0 /VB6), the IDE prompts for a project type, essentially asking “what are we building today?

In VBA the assumption is that you just want to write a bit of script to automate some document manipulation. And then the framework so to speak, is the VBA Standard Library: functions, methods, constants, and actual objects too; all globally-scoped for convenience and quick-and-easy access: a fully spelled-out VBA.Interaction.MsgBox function call is a rare sight! Combined with the nonexistence of namespaces, the flip side is that the global scope is easily polluted, and name collisions are inevitable since anything exposed by any library becomes globally accessible. This makes fully-qualified global function calls appear sporadically sprinkled in the code, which can be confusing. I digress, but what I mean to get at is that this is part of what made Microsoft make the shift to the .NET platform in the early 2000’s, and eventually abandon the Visual Basic Editor to its fate. The COM platform and Win32 API was the framework, and Win32 programming languages built on top of that.

This leaves two approaches for a vision of a “framework” for VBA:

  • Package a type library and ship it.
    • Pros: any COM-visible library will work, can be written in .NET
    • Cons: projects now have a hard dependency on a specific type library; updating is a mess, etc.
  • Embed the framework into VBA projects, pretty much like JavaScript does.
    • Pros: devs are in charge of everything, framework is 100% VBA and inherently open-source, updating is essentially seamless for any non-breaking change, no early-bound dependencies, graceful late-bound degradation, etc.
    • Cons: VBA devs and maintainers that aren’t using Rubberduck will be massively lost in the source code (framework would cleanly leverage @Folder annotations), but then when the host application allows it this could be mitigated by embedding the code into its own separate VBA project and reference it from other projects (e.g. ship an Excel add-in with the framework code your VBA project depends on).

I think I’m slightly biased here, but I think this rules out the type library approach regardless. So we need a way to make this work in VBA, with VBA source code that lives in a GitHub repository with vetted, trusted content.

Where Rubberduck fits in

Like Visual Studio, Rubberduck could prompt VBA devs with “what are we building today?” and offer to pull various “bundles” of modules from this GitHub repository into the active project. Rubberduck would request the available “bundles” from api.rubberduckvba.com, which would return with “bundle metadata” describing each “package” (is “nugget” forbidden to use as a name for these / play on “nuget” (the package manager for .NET)?), and then list them in a nice little dialog.

The “nugget” metadata would include a name, a description, and the path to each file to download for it. Every package would be the same “version”, but the tool could easily request any particular “tag” or “release” version, and/or pull from “main” or from “next” branches, and the source code / framework itself could then easily be a collaborative effort, with its own features and projects and milestones and collaborators, completely separate from the C# Rubberduck code base.

This complete decoupling from Rubberduck means you don’t need to use Rubberduck to leverage this VBA code in your VBA projects, and new tags / “releases” would be entirely independent of Rubberduck’s own release cycles. That means you’re using, say, future-Rubberduck 2.7.4 and the “nuggets” feature offers “v1.0 [main]” and “v1.1 [next]”; one day you’re still using Rubberduck 2.7.4 but now you get “v1.1 [main]”, “v1.0”, and “v1.2 [next]” to chose from, and if you updated the “nuggets” in your project from v1.0 to v1.1 then Rubberduck inspections would flag uses of any obsolete members that would now be decorated with @Obsolete annotations… it’s almost like this annotation was presciently made for this.

But before we can even think of implementing something like this and make MVVM infrastructure the very first “nugget”, we need a rock-solid framework in the first place.


Unit Tests

I had already written the prototype in a highly decoupled manner, mindful of dependencies and how things could later be tested from the outside. I’m very much not-a-zealot when it comes to things like Test-Driven Development (TDD), but I do firmly believe unit tests provide a solid safety net and documentation for everything that matters – especially if the project is to make any kind of framework, where things need to provably work.

And then it makes a wonderful opportunity to blog about writing unit tests with Rubberduck, something I really haven’t written nearly enough about.

Tests? Why?!

Just by writing these tests, I’ve found and fixed edge-case bugs and improved decoupling and cohesion by extracting (and naming!) smaller chunks of functionality into their own separate class module. The result is quite objectively better, simpler code.

Last but not least, writing testable code (let alone the tests!) in VBA makes a great way to learn these more advanced notions and concepts in a language you’re already familiar with.

If you’re new to VBA and programming in general, or if you’re not a programmer and you’re only interested in making macros, then reading any further may make your head spin a bit (if that’s already under way… I’m sorry!), so don’t hesitate to ask here or on the examples repository on GitHub if you have any questions! This article is covering a rather advanced topic, beyond classes and interfaces, but keep in mind that unit testing does not require OOP! It just so happens that object-oriented code adhering to SOLID principles tends to be easily testable.

This is an ongoing project and I’m still working on the test suite and refactoring things; I wouldn’t want to upload the code to GitHub in its current shape, so I’ll come back here with a link once I have something that’s relatively complete.


Where to Start?

There’s a relatively small but very critical piece of functionality that makes a good place to begin in the MVVM infrastructure code (see previous article): the BindingPath class, which I’ve pulled out of PropertyBinding this week. The (still too large for its own good) PropertyBinding class is no longer concerned with the intricacies of resolving property names and values: both this.Source and this.Target are declared As IBindingPath in a PropertyBinding now, which feels exactly right.

The purpose of a BindingPath is to take a “binding context” object and a “binding path” string (the binding path is always relative to the binding context), and to resolve the member call represented there. For example, this would be a valid use of the class:

Dim Path As IBindingPath
Set Path = BindingPath.Create(Sheet1.Shapes("Shape1").TextFrame.Characters, "Text")

This Path object implements TryReadPropertyValue and TryWritePropertyValue methods that the BindingManager can invoke as needed.

'@Folder MVVM.Infrastructure.Bindings
'@ModuleDescription "An object that can resolve a string property path to a value."
'@PredeclaredId
Option Explicit
Implements IBindingPath
Private Type TState
    Context As Object
    Path As String
    
    Object As Object
    PropertyName As String
End Type
Private This As TState
'@Description "Creates a new binding path from the specified property path string and binding context."
Public Function Create(ByVal Context As Object, ByVal Path As String) As IBindingPath
    GuardClauses.GuardNonDefaultInstance Me, BindingPath, TypeName(Me)
    GuardClauses.GuardNullReference Context, TypeName(Me)
    GuardClauses.GuardEmptyString Path, TypeName(Me)
    
    Dim Result As BindingPath
    Set Result = New BindingPath
    Set Result.Context = Context
    Result.Path = Path
    
    Result.Resolve
    Set Create = Result
End Function
'@Description "Gets/Sets the binding context."
Public Property Get Context() As Object
    Set Context = This.Context
End Property
Public Property Set Context(ByVal RHS As Object)
    GuardClauses.GuardDefaultInstance Me, BindingPath, TypeName(Me)
    GuardClauses.GuardNullReference RHS, TypeName(Me)
    GuardClauses.GuardDoubleInitialization This.Context, TypeName(Me)
    Set This.Context = RHS
End Property
'@Description "Gets/Sets a string representing a property path against the binding context."
Public Property Get Path() As String
    Path = This.Path
End Property
Public Property Let Path(ByVal RHS As String)
    GuardClauses.GuardDefaultInstance Me, BindingPath, TypeName(Me)
    GuardClauses.GuardEmptyString RHS, TypeName(Me)
    GuardClauses.GuardDoubleInitialization This.Path, TypeName(Me)
    This.Path = RHS
End Property
'@Description "Gets the bound object reference."
Public Property Get Object() As Object
    Set Object = This.Object
End Property
'@Description "Gets the name of the bound property."
Public Property Get PropertyName() As String
    PropertyName = This.PropertyName
End Property
'@Description "Resolves the Path to a bound object and property."
Public Sub Resolve()
    This.PropertyName = ResolvePropertyName(This.Path)
    Set This.Object = ResolvePropertyPath(This.Context, This.Path)
End Sub
Private Function ResolvePropertyName(ByVal PropertyPath As String) As String
    Dim Parts As Variant
    Parts = Strings.Split(PropertyPath, ".")
    ResolvePropertyName = Parts(UBound(Parts))
End Function
Private Function ResolvePropertyPath(ByVal Context As Object, ByVal PropertyPath As String) As Object
    Dim Parts As Variant
    Parts = Strings.Split(PropertyPath, ".")
    
    If UBound(Parts) = LBound(Parts) Then
        Set ResolvePropertyPath = Context
    Else
        Dim RecursiveProperty As Object
        Set RecursiveProperty = CallByName(Context, Parts(0), VbGet)
        If RecursiveProperty Is Nothing Then Exit Function
        Set ResolvePropertyPath = ResolvePropertyPath(RecursiveProperty, Right$(PropertyPath, Len(PropertyPath) - Len(Parts(0)) - 1))
    End If
    
End Function
Private Property Get IBindingPath_Context() As Object
    Set IBindingPath_Context = This.Context
End Property
Private Property Get IBindingPath_Path() As String
    IBindingPath_Path = This.Path
End Property
Private Property Get IBindingPath_Object() As Object
    Set IBindingPath_Object = This.Object
End Property
Private Property Get IBindingPath_PropertyName() As String
    IBindingPath_PropertyName = This.PropertyName
End Property
Private Sub IBindingPath_Resolve()
    Resolve
End Sub
Private Function IBindingPath_ToString() As String
    IBindingPath_ToString = StringBuilder _
        .AppendFormat("Context: {0}; Path: {1}", TypeName(This.Context), This.Path) _
        .ToString
End Function
Private Function IBindingPath_TryReadPropertyValue(ByRef outValue As Variant) As Boolean
    If This.Object Is Nothing Then Resolve
    On Error Resume Next
    outValue = VBA.Interaction.CallByName(This.Object, This.PropertyName, VbGet)
    IBindingPath_TryReadPropertyValue = (Err.Number = 0)
    On Error GoTo 0
End Function
Private Function IBindingPath_TryWritePropertyValue(ByVal Value As Variant) As Boolean
    If This.Object Is Nothing Then Resolve
    On Error Resume Next
    VBA.Interaction.CallByName This.Object, This.PropertyName, VbLet, Value
    IBindingPath_TryWritePropertyValue = (Err.Number = 0)
    On Error GoTo 0
End Function

Here’s our complete “system under test” (SUT) as far as the BindingPathTests module goes. We have a Create factory method, Context and Path properties, just like the class we’re testing.

The path object is itself read-only once initialized, but the binding source may resolve to Nothing or to a different object reference over the course of the object’s lifetime: say we want a binding path to SomeViewModel.SomeObjectProperty; when we first create the binding, SomeObjectProperty might very well be Nothing, and then it’s later Set-assigned to a valid object reference. This is why the IBindingPath interface needs to expose a Resolve method, so that IPropertyBinding can invoke it as needed, as the binding is being applied.

We’ll want a test for every guard clause, and each method needs at least one test as well.

So, I’m going to add a new test module and call it BindingPathTests. Rubberduck’s templates are good-enough to depict the mechanics and how things work at a high level, but if you stick to the templates you’ll quickly find your unit tests rather boring, wordy, and repetitive: we must break out of the mold, there isn’t one true way to do this!

Rubberduck discovers unit tests in standard modules annotated with @TestModule. Test methods are any [parameterless, for now] method annotated with a @TestMethod annotation that can have a category string – the Test Explorer can group your tests using these categories. The declarations section of a test module must include a declaration (early or late bound) for an Rubberduck.AssertClass or Rubberduck.PermissiveAssertClass (both implement the same internal interface; the “permissive” one has VBA-like equality semantics, and the default one has stricter type equality requirements (a Long can’t be equal to a Double, for example). The default test template also defines a FakesProvider object, but we’re not going to need it now (if we needed to test logic that involved e.g. branching on the result of a MsgBox function call, we could hook into the MsgBox function and configure it to return what the test needs it to return, which is honestly wicked awesome). So our test module might look something like this at first:

'@Folder Tests.Bindings
'@TestModule
Option Explicit
Option Private Module
#Const LateBind = LateBindTests
#If LateBind Then
Private Assert As Object
#Else
Private Assert As Rubberduck.AssertClass
#End If

With this conditionally-compiled setup, all we need to toggle between late and early binding is to define a project-scoped conditional compilation argument: bring up the project properties and type LateBindTests=0 or LateBindTests=1 in that box, and just like that you can control conditional compilation project-wide without modifying a single module.

The first thing to do is to get the test state defined, and implement TestInitialize and TestCleanup methods that configure this state – in the case of BindingManagerTests, I’m going to add a private type and a private field to define and hold the current test state:

Private Type TState
    ExpectedErrNumber As Long
    ExpectedErrSource As String
    ExpectedErrorCaught As Boolean
    
    ConcreteSUT As BindingManager
    AbstractSUT As IBindingManager
    HandlePropertyChangedSUT As IHandlePropertyChanged
    
    BindingSource As TestBindingObject
    BindingTarget As TestBindingObject
    SourcePropertyPath As String
    TargetPropertyPath As String
    Command As TestCommand
End Type
Private Test As TState

Unit Testing Paradigm

Test modules are special, in the sense that they aren’t (absolutely shouldn’t be anyway) accessible from any code path in the project. Rubberduck invokes them one by one when you run a command like “run all tests” or “repeat last run”. But there’s a little more to it than that, worthy of mention.

VBA being single-threaded, tests are invoked by Rubberduck on the UI/main thread, and uses a bit of trickery to keep its own UI somewhat responsive. Each module runs sequentially, and each test inside each module runs sequentially as well – but the test execution order still shouldn’t be considered deterministic, and each test should be completely independent of every other test, such that executing all tests in any given order always produces the same outcomes.

A test that makes no assertions will be green/successful. When writing unit tests, the first thing you want to see is a test that’s failing (you can’t trust a test you have never seen fail!), and with Rubberduck in order to give a test a reason to fail, you use Assert methods (wiki).

When Rubberduck begins processing a test module, it invokes the methods (again, sequentially but not in an order that should matter) marked @ModuleInitialize in the module – ideally that would be only one method.

This is where the Assert object should be assigned (the default test templates do this):

'@ModuleInitialize
Private Sub ModuleInitialize()
#If LateBind Then
    'requires HKCU registration of the Rubberduck COM library.
    Set Assert = CreateObject("Rubberduck.PermissiveAssertClass")
#Else
    'requires project reference to the Rubberduck COM library.
    Set Assert = New Rubberduck.PermissiveAssertClass
#End If
End Sub

Rubberduck’s test engine will then execute all methods (usually cleaner with only one though) annotated with @TestInitialize before executing each test in the module; that is the best place to put the wordy setup code that would otherwise need to be in pretty much every single test of the module:

'@TestInitialize
Private Sub TestInitialize()
    Dim Context As TestBindingObject
    Set Context = New TestBindingObject
    
    Set Context.TestBindingObjectProperty = New TestBindingObject
    
    Test.Path = "TestBindingObjectProperty.TestStringProperty"
    Test.PropertyName = "TestStringProperty"
    Set Test.BindingSource = Context.TestBindingObjectProperty
    
    Set Test.BindingContext = Context
    Set Test.ConcreteSUT = BindingPath.Create(Test.BindingContext, Test.Path)
    Set Test.AbstractSUT = Test.ConcreteSUT
End Sub

By moving the test state to module level rather than having it local to each test, we already eliminate a lot of code duplication, and the Test module variable makes a rather nifty way to access the current test state, too!

Methods annotated with @TestCleanup are automatically invoked after each test in the module; in order to avoid accidentally sharing state between tests, every object reference should be explicitly set to Nothing, and values of intrinsic data types should be explicitly reset to their respective default value:

'@TestCleanup
Private Sub TestCleanup()
    Set Test.ConcreteSUT = Nothing
    Set Test.AbstractSUT = Nothing
    Set Test.BindingSource = Nothing
    Set Test.BindingContext = Nothing
    Test.Path = vbNullString
    Test.PropertyName = vbNullString
    Test.ExpectedErrNumber = 0
    Test.ExpectedErrSource = vbNullString
    Test.ExpectedErrorCaught = False
End Sub

What Goes Into the Test State?

A number of members should always be in the Test state structure:

  • ConcreteSUT (or just SUT) and AbstractSUT both point to the same object, through the default interface (BindingPath) and the explicit one (IBindingPath), respectively.
  • If the system under test class implements additional interfaces, having a pointer to the SUT object with these interfaces is also useful. For example the TState type for the BindingManager class has a HandlePropertyChangedSUT As IHandlePropertyChanged member, because the class implements this interface.
  • Default property values and dependency setup: we want a basic default SUT configured and ready to be tested (or fine-tuned and then tested).
  • ExpectedErrNumber, ExpectedErrSource, and ExpectedErrorCaught are useful when a test is expecting a given input to produce a particular specific error.

Expecting Errors

The “expected error” test method template works for its purpose, but having this on-error-assert logic duplicated everywhere is rather ugly. Consider pulling that logic into a private method instead (I’m considering adding this into Rubberduck’s test module templates):

Private Sub ExpectError()
    Dim Message As String
    If Err.Number = Test.ExpectedErrNumber Then
        If (Test.ExpectedErrSource = vbNullString) Or (Err.Source = Test.ExpectedErrSource) Then
            Test.ExpectedErrorCaught = True
        Else
            Message = "An error was raised, but not from the expected source. " & _
                      "Expected: '" & TypeName(Test.ConcreteSUT) & "'; Actual: '" & Err.Source & "'."
        End If
    ElseIf Err.Number <> 0 Then
        Message = "An error was raised, but not with the expected number. Expected: '" & Test.ExpectedErrNumber & "'; Actual: '" & Err.Number & "'."
    Else
        Message = "No error was raised."
    End If
    
    If Not Test.ExpectedErrorCaught Then Assert.Fail Message
End Sub

With this infrastructure in place, the unit tests for all guard clauses in the module can look like this – it’s still effectively doing Arrange-Act-Assert like the test method templates strongly suggest, only implicitly so (each “A” is essentially its own statement, see comments in the tests below):

'@TestMethod("GuardClauses")
Private Sub Create_GuardsNullBindingContext()
    Test.ExpectedErrNumber = GuardClauseErrors.ObjectCannotBeNothing '<~ Arrange
    On Error Resume Next
        BindingPath.Create Nothing, Test.Path '<~ Act
        ExpectError '<~ Assert
    On Error GoTo 0
End Sub
'@TestMethod("GuardClauses")
Private Sub Create_GuardsEmptyPath()
    Test.ExpectedErrNumber = GuardClauseErrors.StringCannotBeEmpty '<~ Arrange
    On Error Resume Next
        BindingPath.Create Test.BindingContext, vbNullString '<~ Act
        ExpectError '<~ Assert
    On Error GoTo 0
End Sub
'@TestMethod("GuardClauses")
Private Sub Create_GuardsNonDefaultInstance()
    Test.ExpectedErrNumber = GuardClauseErrors.InvalidFromNonDefaultInstance '<~ Arrange
    On Error Resume Next
        With New BindingPath
            .Create Test.BindingContext, Test.Path '<~ Act
            ExpectError '<~ Assert
        End With
    On Error GoTo 0
End Sub

And then similar tests exist for the respective guard clauses of Context and Path members. Having tests that validate that guard clauses are doing their job is great: it tells us exactly how not to use the class… and that doesn’t tell us much about what a BindingPath object actually does.


Testing the Actual Functionality

The methods we’re testing need to be written in a way that makes it possible for a test to determine whether it’s doing its job correctly or not. For functions and properties, the return value is the perfect thing to Assert on. For Sub procedures, you have to Assert on the side-effects, and have verifiable and useful, reliable ways to verify them.

These two tests validate that the BindingPath returned by the Create factory method has resolved the PropertyName and Object properties, respectively.

'@TestMethod("Bindings")
Private Sub Create_ResolvesPropertyName()
    Dim SUT As BindingPath
    Set SUT = BindingPath.Create(Test.BindingContext, Test.Path)
    Assert.IsFalse SUT.PropertyName = vbNullString
End Sub
'@TestMethod("Bindings")
Private Sub Create_ResolvesBindingSource()
    Dim SUT As BindingPath
    Set SUT = BindingPath.Create(Test.BindingContext, Test.Path)
    Assert.IsNotNothing SUT.Object
End Sub

I could have made multiple assertions in a test, like this…

'@TestMethod("Bindings")
Private Sub Create_ResolvesBindingSource()
    Dim SUT As BindingPath
    Set SUT = BindingPath.Create(Test.BindingContext, Test.Path)
    Assert.IsFalse SUT.PropertyName = vbNullString
    Assert.IsNotNothing SUT.Object
End Sub

The Test Explorer would say “IsFalse assert failed” or “IsNotNothing assert failed”, so it’s arguably (perhaps pragmatically so) still useful and clear enough why that test would fail (and if you had multiple Assert.IsFalse calls in a test you could provide a different message for each)… but really as a rule of thumb, tests want to have one reason to fail. If the conditions to meaningfully pass or fail a test aren’t present, use Assert.Inconclusive to report the test as such:

'@TestMethod("Bindings")
Private Sub Resolve_SetsBindingSource()
    With New BindingPath
        .Path = Test.Path
        Set .Context = Test.BindingContext
        
        If Not .Object Is Nothing Then Assert.Inconclusive "Object reference is unexpectedly set."
        .Resolve
        
        Assert.AreSame Test.BindingSource, .Object
    End With
End Sub
'@TestMethod("Bindings")
Private Sub Resolve_SetsBindingPropertyName()
    With New BindingPath
        .Path = Test.Path
        Set .Context = Test.BindingContext
        
        If .PropertyName <> vbNullString Then Assert.Inconclusive "PropertyName is unexpectedly non-empty."
        .Resolve
        
        Assert.AreEqual Test.PropertyName, .PropertyName
    End With
End Sub

This mechanism is especially useful when the test state isn’t in local scope and there’s a real possibility that the TestInitialize method is eventually modified and inadvertently breaks a test. Such conditional Assert.Inconclusive calls are definitely a form of defensive programming, just like having guard clauses throwing custom meaningful errors.

Note that while we know that the BindingPath.Create function invokes the Resolve method, the tests for Resolve don’t involve Create: the Path and Context are being explicitly spelled out, and the .Resolve method is invoked from a New instance.

And that’s pretty much everything there is to test in the BindingPath class.

There’s one thing I haven’t mentioned yet, that you might have caught in the TState type:

BindingSource As TestBindingObject
BindingTarget As TestBindingObject

This TestBindingObject is a test stub: it’s a dependency of the class (it’s the “binding context” of the test path) and it’s a real object, but it is implemented in a bit of a special way that the BindingPath tests don’t do justice to.

Test Stubs

Eventually Rubberduck’s unit testing framework will feature a COM-visible wrapper around Moq, a popular mocking framework for .NET that Rubberduck already uses for its own unit test requirements. When this happens Rubberduck unit tests will no longer need such “test stubs”. Instead, the framework will generate them at run-time and make them work exactly as specified/configured by a unit test, and “just like that” VBA/VB6 suddenly becomes surprisingly close to being pretty much on par with professional, current-day IDE tooling.

The ITestStub interface simply formalizes the concept:

'@Exposed
'@Folder Tests.Stubs
'@ModuleDescription "An object that stubs an interface for testing purposes."
'@Interface
Option Explicit
'@Description "Gets the number of times the specified member was invoked in the lifetime of the object."
Public Property Get MemberInvokes(ByVal MemberName As String) As Long
End Property
'@Description "Gets a string representation of the object's internal state, for debugging purposes (not intended for asserts!)."
Public Function ToString() As String
End Function

A TestStubBase “base class” provides the common implementation mechanics that every class implementing ITestStub will want to use – the idea is to use a keyed data structure to track the number of times each member is invoked during the lifetime of the object:

'@Folder Tests.Stubs
Option Explicit
Private Type TState
    MemberInvokes As Dictionary
End Type
Private This As TState
'@Description "Tracks a new invoke of the specified member."
Public Sub OnInvoke(ByVal MemberName As String)
    Dim newValue As Long
    If This.MemberInvokes.Exists(MemberName) Then
        newValue = This.MemberInvokes.Item(MemberName) + 1
        This.MemberInvokes.Remove MemberName
    Else
        newValue = 1
    End If
    This.MemberInvokes.Add MemberName, newValue
End Sub
'@Description "Gets the number of invokes made against the specified member in the lifetime of this object."
Public Property Get MemberInvokes(ByVal MemberName As String) As Long
    If This.MemberInvokes.Exists(MemberName) Then
        MemberInvokes = This.MemberInvokes.Item(MemberName)
    Else
        MemberInvokes = 0
    End If
End Property
'@Description "Gets a string listing the MemberInvokes cache content."
Public Function ToString() As String
    Dim MemberNames As Variant
    MemberNames = This.MemberInvokes.Keys
    
    With New StringBuilder
        Dim i As Long
        For i = LBound(MemberNames) To UBound(MemberNames)
            Dim Name As String
            Name = MemberNames(i)
            .AppendFormat "{0} was invoked {1} time(s)", Name, This.MemberInvokes.Item(Name)
        Next
        ToString = .ToString
    End With
    
End Function
Private Sub Class_Initialize()
    Set This.MemberInvokes = New Dictionary
End Sub

With this small bit of infrastructure, the TestBindingObject class is a full-fledged mock object that can increment a counter whenever a member is invoked, and that can be injected as a dependency for anything that needs an IViewModel:

'@Folder Tests.Stubs
'@ModuleDescription "An object that can stub a binding source or target for unit tests."
Option Explicit
Implements ITestStub
Implements IViewModel
Implements INotifyPropertyChanged
Private Type TState
    Stub As TestStubBase
    Handlers As Collection
    TestStringProperty As String
    TestNumericProperty As Long
    TestBindingObjectProperty As TestBindingObject
    Validation As IHandleValidationError
End Type
Private This As TState
Public Property Get TestStringProperty() As String
    This.Stub.OnInvoke "TestStringProperty.Get"
    TestStringProperty = This.TestStringProperty
End Property
Public Property Let TestStringProperty(ByVal RHS As String)
    This.Stub.OnInvoke "TestStringProperty.Let"
    If This.TestStringProperty <> RHS Then
        This.TestStringProperty = RHS
        OnPropertyChanged Me, "TestStringProperty"
    End If
End Property
Public Property Get TestNumericProperty() As Long
    This.Stub.OnInvoke "TestNumericProperty.Get"
    TestNumericProperty = This.TestNumericProperty
End Property
Public Property Let TestNumericProperty(ByVal RHS As Long)
    This.Stub.OnInvoke "TestNumericProperty.Let"
    If This.TestNumericProperty <> RHS Then
        This.TestNumericProperty = RHS
        OnPropertyChanged Me, "TestNumericProperty"
    End If
End Property
Public Property Get TestBindingObjectProperty() As TestBindingObject
    This.Stub.OnInvoke "TestBindingObjectProperty.Get"
    Set TestBindingObjectProperty = This.TestBindingObjectProperty
End Property
Public Property Set TestBindingObjectProperty(ByVal RHS As TestBindingObject)
    This.Stub.OnInvoke "TestBindingObjectProperty.Set"
    If Not This.TestBindingObjectProperty Is RHS Then
        Set This.TestBindingObjectProperty = RHS
        OnPropertyChanged Me, "TestBindingObjectProperty"
    End If
End Property
Private Sub OnPropertyChanged(ByVal Source As Object, ByVal PropertyName As String)
    Dim Handler As IHandlePropertyChanged
    For Each Handler In This.Handlers
        Handler.OnPropertyChanged Source, PropertyName
    Next
End Sub
Private Sub Class_Initialize()
    Set This.Stub = New TestStubBase
    Set This.Handlers = New Collection
    Set This.Validation = ValidationManager.Create
End Sub
Private Sub INotifyPropertyChanged_OnPropertyChanged(ByVal Source As Object, ByVal PropertyName As String)
    OnPropertyChanged Source, PropertyName
End Sub
Private Sub INotifyPropertyChanged_RegisterHandler(ByVal Handler As IHandlePropertyChanged)
    This.Handlers.Add Handler
End Sub
Private Property Get ITestStub_MemberInvokes(ByVal MemberName As String) As Long
    ITestStub_MemberInvokes = This.Stub.MemberInvokes(MemberName)
End Property
Private Function ITestStub_ToString() As String
    ITestStub_ToString = This.Stub.ToString
End Function
Private Property Get IViewModel_Validation() As IHandleValidationError
    Set IViewModel_Validation = This.Validation
End Property

This functionality will be extremely useful when testing the actual property bindings: for example we can assert that a method was invoked exactly once, and fail a test if the method was invoked twice (and/or if it never was).


There’s a lot more to discuss about unit testing in VBA with Rubberduck! I hope this article gives a good idea of how to get the best out of Rubberduck’s unit testing feature.

Dependency Injection + Inversion of Control + VBA

Whether VBA can do serious OOP isn’t a question – it absolutely can: none of the SOLID principles have implications that disqualify VBA as a language, and this means we can implement dependency injection and inversion of control. This article will go over the general principles, and then subsequent articles will dive into various dependency injection techniques you can use in VBA code.

A quick summary of these fundamental guidelines, before we peek at DI and IoC:

SOLID

Single Responsibility Principle

Split things up, and then some. Write loop bodies in another procedure, extract if/else blocks into other small specialized procedures. Do as little as possible, aim for each procedure to have a well-defined single responsibility.

Open/Closed Principle

Designing classes that are “open for extension, but closed for modification” is much easier said than done, but definitely worth striving for; by adhering to the other SOLID principles, this one just naturally falls into place. In a nutshell, you’ll want to be able to add features by extending a class rather than modifying it (and risk breaking something) – the only code you need to think about is the code for the new feature… and how you’re going to be testing it.

Liskov Substitution Principle

Say you write a procedure that takes an IFooRepository parameter. Whether you invoke it with some SqlFooRepository, MySqlFooRepository, or FakeFooRepository, should make no difference whatsoever: each implementation fulfills the interface’s contract, each implementation could be swapped for another without altering the logic of the procedure.

Interface Segregation Principle

Write small, specialized interface with a clear purpose, that won’t likely need to grow new members in the future: IFooRepository.GetById is probably fine, but IFooRepository.GetByName looks like someone had a specific or particular implementation in mind when they designed the interface, and now you need to implement a GetByName method for a repository where that makes no sense.

Dependency Inversion Principle

Depend on abstractions, not concrete implementations – your code has dependencies, and you want them abstracted away behind interfaces that you receive as parameters.


What is a dependency?

You’re writing a procedure, and you need to invoke a method that belongs to another object or module – say, MsgBox: with it your procedure can warn the user of an error, or easily get a yes/no answer. But this ability comes with a cost: now there’s no way to invoke that procedure without popping a message box and stopping execution until it’s dismissed. Hard-wired dependencies make unit testing difficult (if not impossible), so we inject them instead, as abstractions.

And dependency injection?

MsgBox is a bad example – Rubberduck’s FakesProvider already lets you configure MsgBox calls any way your testing requires, and no pop-up ..pops up. But let’s say the procedure needs to do things to a Worksheet.

We could make the procedure take a Worksheet parameter, and that would be method injection.

Since we’re in a class module (right?), we could have a Property Set member that takes a Worksheet value argument and assigns it to a Worksheet instance field that our method can work with, and that would be property injection.

We could have a factory method on our class’ default instance, that receives a Worksheet argument and property-injects it to a New instance of the class, then returns an instance of the class that’s ready to use (behind an interface that doesn’t expose any Property Set accessor for the injected dependencies), and that would be as close to the ideal constructor injection as you could get in a language without constructors.

What “control” is inverted, and why?

When a method News up all its dependencies, it’s a control freak that doesn’t let the outside world know anything about what objects it needs to do its job: it’s a black box that other code needs to take as “it just works”, and we can’t do much to alter how it works.

With inversion of control (IoC), you give up that control and let something else New things up for you, and that’s why Dependency Injection (DI) goes hand-in-hand with it. IoC implies completely reversing the dependency graph. Take a UserForm that reads from / writes to a worksheet, with code-behind that implements every little bit of what needs to happen in CommandButton1_Click handlers – a “Smart UI” – reversing the dependency graph means the form’s code-behind is now only concerned about the data it needs to present to the user, and the data it needs to collect from the user; the CommandButton1 button was renamed to AcceptButton, and its Click handler does one single thing: it invokes a SaveChangesCommand object’s Execute method, and everything that was in that click handler is now in that ICommand implementation. The command knows nothing of any userform; it works with the model, that it receives in an Object parameter to its Execute method.

It all comes down to one thing: testability. You want to test your commands and what they do, how they manipulate the model – so you pull as much as possible out of UI-dependent code and into specialized classes that only know as much as they need to know. The form’s code-behind (aka the view) knows about the model, the commands; the model knows about nothing but itself; the commands know about the model; a presenter would know about both the view and the model, but shouldn’t need to care for commands.

If none of the components create their dependencies / if all components have their dependencies injected, then if we follow the dependency chain we arrive to an entry point: in VB6 that would be some Public Sub Main(); in VBA, that could be any Public Sub procedure / “macro” in a standard module, or any Worksheet or Workbook event handler. These entry points all need to New up (or otherwise provide) everything in the dependency graph (e.g. class1 depends on class2 which depends on class3 and class4, …), and then invoke the desired functionality.

What is testable code?

Testable code is code for which you can fully control/inject all the dependencies of that code. This is where coding against abstractions pays off: you can leverage polymorphism and implement test doubles / stubs / fakes as needed. The presence of a New keyword in a method is a rather obvious indicator of a dependency; it’s the implicit dependencies that are harder to spot. These could be a MsgBox prompt, a UserForm dialog, but also Open, Close, Write, Kill, Name keywords, or maybe ActiveSheet, or ActiveWorkbook implicit member calls against a hidden global object; even the current Date can be a hidden dependency if it’s involved in behavior you want to cover with one or more unit tests. The Rnd function is definitely a dependency as well.

SOLID code is inherently testable code. If you write the tests first (Test-Driven Development / TDD), you could even conceivably end up with SOLID-compliant code out of necessity.

Say you want to bring up a dialog that collects some inputs, and one of these inputs needs to be a decimal value greater than or equal to 0 but less than 1 – what are the odds that such validation logic ends up buried in some TextBox12_Change handler (and duplicated in 3 places) in the UserForm module if the problem is tackled from a testability standpoint? That’s right: exactly none.

If the first thing you do is create a MyViewModelTests module with a MySpecialDecimal_InvalidIfGreaterThanOne test method, there’s a good chance your next move could be to add a MyViewModel class with a MySpecialDecimal property – be it only so that the test method can compile:

'@TestMethod("ValidationTests")
Public Sub MySpecialDecimal_InvalidIfGreaterThanOne()
    Dim sut As MyViewModel
    Set sut = New MyViewModel
    sut.MySpecialDecimal = 42
    Assert.IsFalse sut.IsValid
End Sub

So we need this MyViewModel.IsValid member now:

Public Property Get IsValid() As Boolean
End Property

At this point we can run the test in Rubberduck’s Test Explorer, and see it fail. Never trust a test you’ve never seen fail! The next step is to write just enough code to make the test pass:

Public Property Get IsValid() As Boolean
    IsValid = MySpecialDecimal < 1
End Property

This prompts us to write another test that we know would fail:

'@TestMethod("ValidationTests")
Public Sub MySpecialDecimal_InvalidIfNegative()
    Dim sut As MyViewModel
    Set sut = New MyViewModel
    sut.MySpecialDecimal = -1
    Assert.IsFalse sut.IsValid
End Sub

So we tweak the code to make it pass:

Public Property Get IsValid() As Boolean
    IsValid = MySpecialDecimal >= 0 And MySpecialDecimal < 1
End Property

We then run the whole test suite, to validate that this change didn’t break any green test, which would mean a regression bug was introduced – and the red test is telling you exactly which input scenario broke.


In a vanilla VBE, OOP quickly gets out of hand, for any decently-sized project: wading through many class modules in the legacy editor, locating implementations of the interfaces you’re coding against – things that you would seamlessly deal with in a modern IDE, become excruciatingly painful when modules are all listed alphabetically under one single “classes” folder, and when Ctrl+F “Implements {name}” is the only thing that can help you locate interface implementations.

Rubberduck not only addresses the organization of your OOP project (with “@Folder” annotations that let you organize & regroup modules by functionality) and enhances navigation tooling (“find all implementations”, “find all references”, “find symbol”, etc.), it also provides a unit testing framework, so that testing your VBA code is done the same way it’s done in other languages and modern IDEs, with Assert expressions that make or break a green test.

But if you write unit tests for your object-oriented VBA code, you’ll quickly notice that when your tests need to inject a fake implementation of a dependency, a consequence is that you often end up with a lot of “test fake” classes whose sole purpose is to support unit testing. This is double-edged, because you need to be careful that you’re testing the right thing (i.e. the actual object/method under test) and not whether your test fake/stub is behaving correctly.

Rubberduck has well over 5K unit tests, and most of them would be very hard to implement without the ability to setup proper mocking. Using the popular Moq framework, we are able to create and configure these “test fakes” without actually writing a class that implements the interface we need to inject into the component we’re testing.

Soon, these capabilities will land in the VBA landscape, with Rubberduck’s unit testing tools wrapping up Moq to let VBA code do exactly that.