OOP Battleship Part 3: The View

Download the macro-enabled Excel workbook here

Now that we have defined our model, we need a view. In MVC terms, the view is the component that’s making the game state visible to the player; it is responsible for the two-way communication with the controller. Since we’re in Microsoft Excel, we can use a worksheet to do this. So we craft a lovely-looking Battleship game screen:

pgyam

I used a stock image for the background, spent more time than I probably should have looking for images of the game ships, and used a number of rounded rectangle shapes to make various boxes and buttons – the clickable ones being attached to sheet-local macros. The two game grids use a customized 5-icon conditional format that not-so-coincidentally map to the GridState enum values:

jxpfw

If you recall from the previous post, the GridState enum was defined as follows:

Public Enum GridState
'@Description("Content at this coordinate is unknown.")
Unknown = -1
'@Description("Unconfirmed friendly ship position.")
PreviewShipPosition = 0
'@Description("Confirmed friendly ship position.")
ShipPosition = 1
'@Description("Unconfirmed invalid/overlapping ship position.")
InvalidPosition = 2
'@Description("No ship at this coordinate.")
PreviousMiss = 3
'@Description("An enemy ship occupies this coordinate.")
PreviousHit = 4
End Enum

The PlayerGrid class has a StateArray read-only property that returns a 2D variant array with Unknown values being Empty, and the rest of the state values being returned as-is: this means in order to “refresh” the view, all we need to do is dump this 2D variant array onto the appropriate game grid, and we’re done!

Private Property Get PlayerGrid(ByVal gridId As Byte) As Range
    Set PlayerGrid = Me.Names("PlayerGrid" & gridId).RefersToRange
End Property

Public Sub RefreshGrid(ByVal grid As PlayerGrid)
    Application.ScreenUpdating = False
    Me.Unprotect
    PlayerGrid(grid.gridId).Value = Application.WorksheetFunction.Transpose(grid.StateArray)
    Me.Protect
    Me.EnableSelection = xlUnlockedCells
    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
End Sub

Listing all the code here like I did for the model post would be rather boring, so I’m not going to do that. If the model was just a handful of classes with factory methods and explicit interfaces, the view is much more interesting as a concept.

The worksheet handles 3 worksheet events:

Private Sub Worksheet_BeforeDoubleClick(ByVal target As Range, ByRef Cancel As Boolean)
    Cancel = True
    Dim gridId As Byte
    Dim position As IGridCoord
    Set position = RangeToGridCoord(target, gridId)
    If Mode = FleetPosition Or Mode = player1 And gridId = 2 Or Mode = player2 And gridId = 1 Then
        RaiseEvent DoubleClick(gridId, position, Mode)
    End If
End Sub

Private Sub Worksheet_BeforeRightClick(ByVal target As Range, Cancel As Boolean)
    Cancel = True
    If Mode = FleetPosition Then
        Dim gridId As Byte
        Dim position As IGridCoord
        Set position = RangeToGridCoord(target, gridId)
        RaiseEvent RightClick(gridId, position, Mode)
    End If
End Sub

Private Sub Worksheet_SelectionChange(ByVal target As Range)
    Dim gridId As Byte
    Dim position As IGridCoord
    Set position = RangeToGridCoord(target, gridId)
    If Not position Is Nothing Then
        Me.Unprotect
        CurrentSelectionGrid(gridId).Value = position.ToA1String
        CurrentSelectionGrid(IIf(gridId = 1, 2, 1)).Value = Empty
        Me.Protect
        Me.EnableSelection = xlUnlockedCells
        RaiseEvent SelectionChange(gridId, position, Mode)
    End If
End Sub

Notice these aren’t doing anything really – they merely work out a way to talk to another component – see, making a worksheet (or any document module class) implement an interface is a very bad idea: don’t do it (unless you like to crash the host and lose everything). So instead, we make another class implement the “view” interfaces, and make that class talk to the worksheet – a bit like we did in There is no worksheet.

The view needs two interfaces: one for the controller to send messages to the view, and the other for the view to send messages to the controller. If we call controller-to-view messages “commands”, and view-to-controller messages “events”, then the names IGridViewEvents and IGridViewCommands make complete sense!

So the WorksheetView class (not the GameSheet worksheet) implements the IGridViewCommands interface, like this:

Private Sub IGridViewCommands_OnBeginAttack(ByVal currentPlayerGridId As Byte)
    sheetUI.ShowInfoBeginAttackPhase currentPlayerGridId
End Sub

Private Sub IGridViewCommands_OnBeginShipPosition(ByVal currentShip As IShip, ByVal player As IPlayer)
    sheetUI.ShowInfoBeginDeployShip currentShip.Name
End Sub

Private Sub IGridViewCommands_OnBeginWaitForComputerPlayer()
    Application.Cursor = xlWait
    Application.StatusBar = "Please wait..."
End Sub

the WorksheetView class also handles the custom events sent from the worksheet, like this:

Private Sub sheetUI_DoubleClick(ByVal gridId As Byte, ByVal position As IGridCoord, ByVal Mode As ViewMode)
    Select Case Mode
        
        Case ViewMode.FleetPosition
            ViewEvents.ConfirmShipPosition gridId, position
            
        Case ViewMode.player1, ViewMode.player2
            ViewEvents.AttackPosition gridId, position
            
    End Select
End Sub

Private Sub sheetUI_PlayerReady()
    ViewEvents.HumanPlayerReady
End Sub

Private Sub sheetUI_RightClick(ByVal gridId As Byte, ByVal position As IGridCoord, ByVal Mode As ViewMode)
    If Mode = FleetPosition Then ViewEvents.PreviewRotateShip gridId, position
End Sub

Private Sub sheetUI_SelectionChange(ByVal gridId As Byte, ByVal position As IGridCoord, ByVal Mode As ViewMode)
    If Mode = FleetPosition Then ViewEvents.PreviewShipPosition gridId, position
End Sub

So what is this ViewEvents? If VBA allowed an interface to expose events, we wouldn’t need it: we would simply raise an event to relay the message directly to the controller, who would then handle the view events and respond with a command back to the view. But VBA does not let us expose events on an interface, so this is where the adapter pattern kicks in.

We have a GridViewAdapter class that implements both IGridViewEvents and IGridViewCommands interfaces; the WorksheetView holds a (weak) reference to the adapter, through its IGridViewEvents interface – so ViewEvents.AttackPosition is a method on the adapter.

The GridViewAdapter class receives these messages from the view, and relays them back to the controller, via events:

Private Sub IGridViewEvents_AttackPosition(ByVal gridId As Byte, ByVal position As IGridCoord)
    RaiseEvent OnAttackPosition(gridId, position)
End Sub

Private Sub IGridViewEvents_ConfirmShipPosition(ByVal gridId As Byte, ByVal position As IGridCoord)
    RaiseEvent OnConfirmCurrentShipPosition(gridId, position)
End Sub

Private Sub IGridViewEvents_CreatePlayer(ByVal gridId As Byte, ByVal pt As PlayerType, ByVal difficulty As AIDifficulty)
    RaiseEvent OnCreatePlayer(gridId, pt, difficulty)
End Sub

Private Sub IGridViewEvents_HumanPlayerReady()
    RaiseEvent OnPlayerReady
End Sub

Private Sub IGridViewEvents_PreviewRotateShip(ByVal gridId As Byte, ByVal position As IGridCoord)
    RaiseEvent OnRotateCurrentShipPosition(gridId, position)
End Sub

Private Sub IGridViewEvents_PreviewShipPosition(ByVal gridId As Byte, ByVal position As IGridCoord)
    RaiseEvent OnPreviewCurrentShipPosition(gridId, position)
End Sub

The GameController has a Private WithEvents viewAdapter As GridViewAdapter private field, and with that it’s able to respond to the adapter’s events and, say, create a HumanPlayer in grid 1, or a MercilessAI AI player in grid2 – and then instruct the view to begin positioning the ships, one by one, until the game is ready to begin.

Apart from events, the worksheet exposes methods that display, hide, or flash such or such shape, depending on what the controller says needs to happen next: the worksheet doesn’t control anything whatsoever about the game mechanics – that’s the controller’s job. The view raises events, the adapter handles them and relays them to the controller; controller alters game state, and then sends a command to the view to reflect the current state.

This makes the controller blissfully unaware about any worksheet, or event about any WorksheetView class: it knows about the GridViewAdapter, but then looking at how the game is started…

Public Sub PlayWorksheetInterface()
    Dim view As WorksheetView
    Set view = New WorksheetView
    
    Dim randomizer As IRandomizer
    Set randomizer = New GameRandomizer
    
    Set controller = New GameController
    controller.NewGame GridViewAdapter.Create(view), randomizer
End Sub

…we can easily infer that the adapter would work with any class that implements the IGridViewCommands interface and that’s able to “adapt” its event model to the IGridViewEvents methods: the components are said to be decoupled; we can easily swap one implementation for another – be it for unit-testing the individual components… or we could implement a view that has nothing to do with any Excel worksheet.

We could easily add another button to the start screen, attach it to some PlayUserFormInterface macro, and do something like this:

Public Sub PlayUserFormInterface()
    Dim view As UserFormView
    Set view = New UserFormView
    
    Dim randomizer As IRandomizer
    Set randomizer = New GameRandomizer
    
    Set controller = New GameController
    controller.NewGame GridViewAdapter.Create(view), randomizer
End Sub

And then play the exact same game with a UI that’s entirely different.

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